2017-06-15 / Front Page

Officials reach out to GDOT about dangerous intersection


In an effort to address the dangerous intersection of Highways 220 and 47 at Cliatt Crossing, a meeting with local, state, and Georgia DOT of­ficials was held, as (front, l-r) Commission Chairman Walker Norman, GDOT Traffic Operations Official Kedrick..Collins., .(back,..l-r) .Com­missioner Cooper Cliatt, State Senator Lee Anderson, GDOT District Engineer Jimmy Smith, and Lincoln County Public Works Director Roby Seymour were in attendance to discuss county options. In an effort to address the dangerous intersection of Highways 220 and 47 at Cliatt Crossing, a meeting with local, state, and Georgia DOT of­ficials was held, as (front, l-r) Commission Chairman Walker Norman, GDOT Traffic Operations Official Kedrick..Collins., .(back,..l-r) .Com­missioner Cooper Cliatt, State Senator Lee Anderson, GDOT District Engineer Jimmy Smith, and Lincoln County Public Works Director Roby Seymour were in attendance to discuss county options. In light of the many fatal and de­structive wrecks that have occurred not only recently, but over the past several years, at the intersection of Highways 47 and 220 at Cliatt Crossing, Lincoln County officials met with officials from the state government and officials with the Georgia Department of Transporta­tion to discuss potential measures that can be taken to increase safety, and ultimately decrease the number of wrecks from occurring at the at the thoroughfare.

“We’ve received reports that recorded 6,490 vehicles driving through the intersection at Cliatt Crossing on Mondays through Fri­days, and we know that the count on weekends is even higher than that,” Chairman Walker Norman said.

In an effort to address the high amount of traffic traveling through the intersection, Norman, Commis­sioner

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Cooper Cliatt, and Public Works Director Roby Seymour met with State Senator Lee Anderson, GDOT Traffic Operations Official Kedrick Collins, and GDOT District Engineer Jimmy Smith last week to discuss the county’s options.

“What I believe people will see in the next 60-90 days are the lines being re-painted at the intersection; we’ll have some of the detour signs relocated because it’s blocking the vision of the drivers; and we’ll have signage put up on both sides of 47 that have the blinking crossroads lights on them,” Norman said.

Caution lights are currently not in consideration, because the state recommends utilizing other means of traffic warnings.

In the mean time, traffic studies and other data collection will be conducted for possible future adjust­ments to the intersection.

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