2005-08-04 / People

Norman relatives visit monument; families will gather for reunion

Submitted by the Norman Family



J.B. Norman, Murray Norman and Dan Norman brought along their

copy of The Lincoln Journal as they visited the statue of Kerenhappuch

Norman Turner, the sixth great-aunt of Murray. The statue is located

in the Gailford Courthouse National Military Park in Greensboro, N.C.

Mrs. Norman rode from Halifax County, Virginia to nurse her sons

and other wounded soldiers at the Battle of Guilford Courthouse.

J.B. Norman, Murray Norman and Dan Norman brought along their copy of The Lincoln Journal as they visited the statue of Kerenhappuch Norman Turner, the sixth great-aunt of Murray. The statue is located in the Gailford Courthouse National Military Park in Greensboro, N.C. Mrs. Norman rode from Halifax County, Virginia to nurse her sons and other wounded soldiers at the Battle of Guilford Courthouse. The Norman Family’s Biennial Reunion is scheduled for August 5 and 6 in Lincolnton. This reunion primarily involves descendants of William Norman, the first Norman to become a resident of Lincoln County, Georgia.

A monument to the memory of William Norman was erected in an old cemetery in the Midway Community.

Lois Norman in her book, The Normans of Normandy Hall, included a picture of a statue of Kerenhappuch Norman Turner, aunt of William Norman.

This picture and the accompanying story have intrigued Murray Toombs Norman for years.

Kerenhappuch Norman was born in 1690 to Isaac Norman, Jr. and his wife, Frances Nee Courtney in Virginia.

The Normans had three daughters who were given the names of Job’s three daughters, Jemimah, Keziah and Kerenhappuch.

Kerenhappuch was married around 1710 to James Turner. She bore five children, the youngest being a son, James Turner, Jr. After the death of her husband, she moved with her son to Halifax, Virginia where she was living at the time of the Revolutionary War.

Her son joined the Virginia Militia as a captain. She instructed him to let her know if he were wounded in the war. She was a very skilled horseback rider and carried supplies for the Army through the lines of the unsuspecting British.

Her son received very serious wounds during the Battle of Guilford Courthouse in Greensboro, N.C. in 1781. When word of this reached his mother, she rode her horse from her home in Maryland to the present Greensboro, N.C. to the scene of fighting and successfully devised a method to treat his wounds and that of others and nurse these victims back into service.

She is said to have placed the wounded in a log cabin beneath bare rafters. She bored holes in tin tubs, placing them upon these rafters. She filled the tubs with cool, clear water and let the water drip upon the wounds keeping them cool and clean, allaying the fever and preventing infection.

She is said to have devised a treatment as effective as modern ice packs.

After the war, she and her son moved to Richmond County, N.C. where in 1805 at the age of 105, she died of a broken neck suffered from falling off a horse while hunting.

What is believed to be the first statue ever erected to an American heroine was dedicated on July 4, 1902 in the Guilford Courthouse National Military Park in Greensboro, N.C. Two of her kinsmen, James T. and Joseph Morehead were instrumental in erecting the monument to her memory. (Dates of this story may vary as records were more verbal than written back then).

Dan and Teresa Norman and their son, James, of Blowing Rock, N.C., fulfilled a dream for Murray by taking him, along with Mickey and grandchildren, Heather, Hannah and Rebekah Thompson, to Guilford Courthouse National Military Park in Greensboro, N.C. on July 19 to view this statue.

Mrs. Jeff Smith of Lexington Park, Maryland and Lydia Norman of Raleigh, N.C. joined the group at the park for the tour. The massive statue of Nathanael Green upon his horse was also of interest to the group as he was appointed commander of the Southern Army and died in Georgia.

Murray expressed his pleasure and deep appreciation in being there as feeling as if, “A dream came true.” Kerenhappuch is Murray’s sixthgreat aunt. She is seven times greataunt to Dan and eight times greataunt to James Robert, Ashley, Lydia, Heather, Hannah and Rebekah.

The Norman Heritage continues and will be celebrated on Friday evening, August 5, with “The Kith and Kin” fellowship at The Lincoln Center, memorialized on Saturday morning, August 6, at Midway Methodist Church where Walker Norman will lead a service remembering deceased members, and on Saturday evening, enjoy a barbecue dinner and historical skits at The Lincoln Center.

A tour of several cemeteries in the Midway and Goshen Communities is optional for those attending the reunion.

Murray Norman maintains these old cemeteries and will lead the tour on Saturday afternoon.

Return to top